Three interesting new studies on European genetics were released this year, meaning that we now have pretty good data on the entire history of Europe, from the Paleolithic to the present day. The third study is a big whitepill for nationalists.

(1) Population Genomics of Stone Age Eurasia
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2022.05.04.490594v2
(2) The genomic origins of the world’s first farmers
https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(22)00455-X
(3) Stable population structure in Europe since the Iron Age, despite high mobility
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2022.05.15.491973v1

Summaries below.

(1) Population Genomics of Stone Age Eurasia

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2022.05.04.490594v2

This massive paper contains too much information to summarize here, but key discoveries included: The origins of the Germanic people and the rise of the PRE-Indo-European I1 haplogroup in Scandinavia; a new 25kya Paleolithic Caucasus Hunter-Gatherer genome (similar to Dzudzuana); the Corded Ware Culture arose from mixing between Yamnaya-like PIE and EEF of the Globular Amphora Culture (almost all Indo-European people today have at least some GAC ancestry); a genetically Yamnaya-like hunter-gatherer population (60-70% EHG + 20-30% CHG) lived on the Middle Don 2000 years before the Yamnaya culture arose (this debunks the hypothesis that PIE languages are derived from Iranians).

Selected figures:

Principal component analysis.

Ancestry proportions in modern populations. Note: This is a pretty bad model. Anatolian ancestry does not peak in North Africa and Eastern Hunter-Gatherer ancestry does not peak in Mongolia.

Admixture and pigmentation prediction models for populations in Denmark.

Modeling early Holocene populations using four Paleolithic populations as sources: Europeans (Aurignacians and Gravettians), Ancient North Eurasians, Caucasians (Dzudzuana-related), and Neolithic Iranians (as a proxy for Paleolithic Iranians).

(2) The genomic origins of the world’s first farmers

https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(22)00455-X

This study investigates the origins of Early European Farmers (EEF, who account for ~25-90% of European ancestry) and provides a simple model of West Eurasian (“Caucasoid”) genetics (minus the Ancient North Eurasians) from the Ice Age to the early Holocene:

  • >27kya, before the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), West Eurasians constituted one relatively homogeneous population.
  • 20-25kya, during the LGM, this population diverged into distinct European and West Asian populations.
  • 15kya, after the LGM, West Asians further diverged into Western and Eastern groups.
  • 14.2kya, during the Bølling warming period, the Western group intermixed with European hunter-gatherers (WHG) who had migrated into Anatolia during the LGM.
  • 13.8kya, during the Older Dryas cooling period, these previously connected populations were separated; the admixed proto-EEF population split into an Anatolian group and a Caucasian group (which would become Caucasus Hunter-Gatherers).
  • 12.9kya, during the Allerød warming period, the Anatolian group further intermixed with WHG, by this point, Anatolians had significantly diverged from other West Asian populations.
  • 9kya, Anatolians begin to migrate into Europe as the Early European Farmers.

Selected figures:

Summary image.

Summary image 2.

Principal component analysis.

Multidimensional scaling analysis (showing genetic drift).

(3) Stable population structure in Europe since the Iron Age, despite high mobility

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2022.05.15.491973v1

This study discovered that the genetics of modern Europeans do not reflect the level of immigration within and to Europe from the Iron Age to the present day. Authors concluded that the non-local individuals (around 8% of the population across Europe, including intra-European migrants) were temporary migrants, such as traders and laborers, who left little to no genetic impact on the regional populations of Europe. This is good news for nationalists, as it shows that cosmopolitan opportunists do not leave a big genetic impact.

Selected figures:

Principal component analysis of modern populations.

Principal component analyses of ancient samples projected onto modern populations broken down by region and time period.