Contents:
1. Introduction
2. What is a conspiracy theory?
3. Trust The Experts
4. “Anti-Semitism”
5. Political implications

1. Introduction

Globalist elites have bravely united to tell the unwashed masses that the world is not being “manipulated behind the scenes by powerful forces with negative intent” and that “no one is to blame.” To blame for what? They don’t specify. A very convincing argument!

The United Nations has teamed up with Twitter, the World Jewish Congress, and the European Union’s executive commission to “stop the spread” of “dangerous” conspiracy theories. (Criticism of rootless plutocrats is the real virus). Why are so-called conspiracy theories “dangerous”? Because they “spread mistrust in public institutions” and “identify an enemy […] that threatens peoples’ lives or beliefs” which can “spark a defense mechanism.” Trust the system. We would never lie to you. Please don’t kick us out of power, we’re your friends!

The ThinkBeforeSharing campaign was launched in 2020 in response to the COVID scamdemic, which “sparked a worrying rise in disinformation and conspiracy theories.” According to the United Nations, it aims to teach people how to “identify, debunk, react to and report on conspiracy theories.” Key figures involved with this project include Stephan Lewandowsky, a World Economic Forum “Agenda Contributor,” and John Cook, another World Economic Forum “Agenda Contributor.”

Currently, ThinkBeforeSharing consists of a set of guidelines that were transformed into a series of infographics and web pages. Although it appears to be a simple public awareness campaign, the project may be a framework for intra-elite education. The guidelines were recently republished and expanded upon by the United Nations Section for Global Citizenship and Peace Education as part of their Agenda 21/2030 Sustainable Development education program.

  • Note: For more information on “Peace Education,” see this article that covers the bizarre origins of our modern education system, and for more info on Agenda 21, see this article.

2. What is a conspiracy theory?

According to Team Globalism, conspiracy theories are “the belief that certain events or situations are secretly manipulated behind the scenes by powerful forces with negative intent.” They claim that all “conspiracy theories” share six common characteristics:

1. An alleged, secret plot.
2. A group of conspirators.
3. ‘Evidence’ that seems to support the conspiracy theory.
4. They falsely suggest that nothing happens by accident and that there are no coincidences; nothing is as it appears and everything is connected.
5. They divide the world into good or bad.
6. They scapegoat people and groups.

Well, that settles it: World events are a series of happy accidents, there are no bad guys, and “groups of people” do not secretly collaborate to attain more power and wealth. To suggest otherwise is dangerous crazytalk.

The ThinkBeforeSharing guidelines also claim that conspiracy theories take root by asking “who is benefiting from the event or situation.” Cui bono? Cui prodest? Ad cuius bonum? No, no, no. Stop asking silly questions. Remember: “No one is to blame.”

3. Trust The Experts

Amazingly, they do admit (in smallprint) that real conspiracies “large and small” do exist. However, they claim that real conspiracies are only centered on “single, self-contained events” like assassinations, and that they are always exposed by the mainstream media.

If it wasn’t exposed by the mainstream media, it wasn’t a real conspiracy. If it requires long-term planning (e.g. conquering the world through usury) or the shaping of broad events (e.g. replacing White people with Third World immigrants), then it’s a baseless “conspiracy theory.” Simple.

They go on to claim that something is “unlikely to be a conspiracy theory” if “the author has recognised qualifications and credentials in the topic” or “the source has been quoted by several reputable media outlets.” This is very convenient, since their #1 piece of advice for combatting “conspiracy theories” is to post “verified information” from official “fact-checking” websites (that are in no way politically biased in favor of the Globalist agenda).

4. “Anti-Semitism”

“Conspiracy theories can be dangerous: they often target and discriminate against vulnerable groups […] Perceived “out groups” of society are especially prone to be targets of conspiracy theories […] this includes people of different origin, religion or sexual orientation.”

Although the main message of ThinkBeforeSharing is that the Globalist elite are totally benevolent and transparent, a significant proportion of the campaign, to be frank, is dedicated to defending Jewish political power. You aren’t allowed to notice that elites collaborate to consolidate or expand political power, but you definitely aren’t allowed to notice that ethnic groups do the same thing.

ThinkBeforeSharing claims that while “not all conspiracy theories target Jews,” they have (for no apparent reason) “been the target of conspiracy theories for centuries.” Jews have been “falsely blamed” for moments of crisis, ranging from wars to economic collapses. They list the “most common anti-Semitic narratives” as those that claim Jews “control the government, the media or banks for malicious purposes.” (You’re allowed to claim that Jews control the government, media, and banks if you say they’re doing it for benevolent purposes). ThinkBeforeSharing warns people to watch out for anything that ascribes a conspiratorial motive to Jewish individuals or groups, like the Rothschild family or George Soros, who they describe as “a philanthropist.”

So, in summary, out groups are never responsible for conspiracies. Nobody is grooming your kids. Nobody controls the banks and the media. Nobody is intentionally replacing White people with immigrants. Nepotism and intra-ethnic collaboration are a myth. If you notice that any particular demographics are overrepresented in society’s organs of influence or are disproportionately involved with certain political agendas, then you are an evil bigot, a violent extremist, and potentially a domestic terrorist.

5. Political implications

One final thing to consider is how this framework and others like it will be used in conjunction with the rapidly encroaching social credit system. Once countries have implemented digital identity and central bank digital currencies, all political dissent will effectively be abolished. AI systems (which already monitor and moderate social media) will use guidelines like ThinkBeforeSharing to blacklist naughty conspiracy theorists who require urgent reeducation.