About

Contents:
1. This site
2. Author
3. What does “Thuletide” mean?


1. This site

This site covers a range of intertwined topics but focuses on politics, history, and biology. Articles often feature useful statistics and scientific studies. So, if that’s your bag, then check the ‘Statistics and Data’ tag.

If you feel like the world is descending into madness, that you were born in the wrong generation, or that the society you grew up in no longer exists, then you are in the right place.

If you are interested in European history, genetics, archaeology, vintage anthropology, mythology, “conspiracy theories” (conspiracy facts), and the “culture war,” then you are in the right place.

If you dislike Globalism and all of its ideological trappings (the creation of a world-governing technocracy, the abolition of nations, families, religion, and traditional cultures, the centralization of all production, communication, and transportation in the hands of a tiny, rootless elite), then you are in the right place.


2. Author

The question I am asked most frequently is: “What ideology do you identify with?” Simply put, I don’t — I just call myself “Right-Wing.” You could call me a conservative, traditionalist, reactionary, paleo-con, and so on — it really doesn’t matter to me. All Right-Wing thought converges towards one end (a natural, organic society) and certain fundamental truths. There are only so many ways to say “I’m pro: family, religion, ethnocentrism/nationalism, private property, free enterprise (unless it betrays the nation), hierarchy, strength, beauty, nature, etc., and anti: globalism, usury, immigration, etc.” Perhaps the most accurate descriptor is “a grumpy small-town Reactionary,” like J. R. R. Tolkien.

3. What does “Thuletide” mean?

“Thuletide” is a combination of Yuletide, the indigenous Germanic winter festival, and Thule, the northern land of eternal sun from Greco-Roman mythology, home to the mysterious Hyperboreans.

Thule or Hyperborea is referenced by the Indian nationalist and independence activist Bal Gangadhar Tilak in his 1903 book, The Arctic Home in the Vedas. Tilak used Vedic sources to argue that the Proto-Indo-Europeans — from whom Northwest Europeans trace approximately half of our ancestry — originally inhabited the northern polar region but were forced out of their homeland during the Last Glacial Maximum of the Ice Age, whereafter they migrated to Europe and parts of Asia.

The book contains some pseudohistory but its hypothesis was broadly correct in an unexpected way: Recent archaeogenetic discoveries have unveiled that the ancestors of the Proto-Indo-Europeans did inhabit the polar circle in Siberia during the Ice Age and they were forced out by climate change. Today, we call these people the Ancient North Eurasians. Modern Northwest Europeans trace around ~25% of our ancestry to this population in total, as well as our oldest mythology, which we share with Native Americans and East Asian Siberians, who also have significant Ancient North Eurasian ancestry.

Below: Sadly, we don’t have any Ancient North Eurasian facial reconstructions, so here’s a picture of an Eastern European Hunter-Gatherer with ~75% Ancient North Eurasian ancestry.

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